THE MODERN ERA OR THE GOLDEN AGE OF ORLEANS

ORLÉANS AND THE REFORM

In the 16th century, Orléans was an important site of the Reform in France.

The prestige of the university brought in many humanists who passed on Greek and Latin culture and new ideas among the urban elite. In parallel, the theses of Luther reached Orléans via students of German studies and developed. In the middle of the 16th century, the city appeared as one of the main cities of the Reform in France.

The failure of the general assemblies held in Orléans in 1560-1561, during which king François II died, announced the start of the civil war. Orléans suffered due to the wars of Religion.

THE GRAND CENTURY OF ORLEANS

The city took full advantage of its geographic situation and the period of peace, which was established in France at the start of the 18th century, to get rich.

By land, the paved route boosted trade with Paris. By water, shipments of colonial foodstuffs from the West Indies arrived from Nantes and were then re-shipped to French and foreign cities. Workshops in Orléans also processed them into manufactured products: sugar, vinegar, textiles.

In addition, the land of vineyards and orchards exported its own productions.

The prosperity of Orléans, which continued to develop with the Revolution, was visible in the development of secondary residences on the banks of the Loiret and the surrounding castles. A worldly life developed, marked by the love of gardens and fine arts, such as at Château de La Source.

 

Sources: Orléans Mairie – City of Art and History Department